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Winter and Rock Salt

GreenWelcomeWe have been remiss in not keeping our animal blog up to date. As expected we know we have lost blog readers; but that’s ok, we will work on earning them back. To start, here is our post on the dangers of Rock Salt and our pets.

Each year many thousands of cats and dogs die or are made severely ill from the toxic effects of rock salt.

Local municipalities frequently use rock salt after heavy snow with sand or grit to improve traction. Householders may use it to help melt ice and snow on paths and make it easier to spade or sweep away.

Grey tabby cat sitting on post

Rock salt is very poisonous to cats and dogs. Unfortunately, they can easily ingest it when they lick their fur after being outdoors. The result can be fatal. According to the RSPCA:

It is difficult to say how much needs to be eaten for signs of toxicity to be seen. Even a small amount of pure salt can be very dangerous to pets. Ingestion can result in a high blood sodium concentration which can cause thirst, vomiting and lethargy, and in severe cases there is a risk of convulsions and kidney damage.

Most cases involve animals that have walked through gritted snow and then lick or chew it off their paws as they can find it irritating. It is therefore important to thoroughly wipe your pet’s feet and the fur on his/her legs and tummy after a walk or time outside. If he/she is showing any signs of discomfort after possible exposure to rock salt, use a mild, pet-safe shampoo and warm water to wash the affected areas, and dry your pet’s fur completely with a towel after washing.

Any animal suspected of ingestion of rock salt must be assessed by a vet immediately. This is important as signs can be non-specific and a blood test will be required to check the blood sodium concentration. Immediate veterinary treatment will be needed to rehydrate the animal and stabilise their sodium levels. The exact treatment will depend on the blood sodium concentration and the animal’s clinical condition. Owners should never attempt to induce vomiting; only a vet should do this.

If you suspect your cat has ingested rock salt do not wait to see the symptoms develop, but seek veterinary advice without delay. Again this emphasizes the importance of keeping cats indoors during severe weather whenever this is practical.

shared from the Pussington Post

Senior

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Do you have a dog who thinks they are alpha?

We do, and her name is Lucy. Lucy is a rat terrier mix and is approximately 9 years old. I say approximately because she is a rescue and we can only go by the paperwork provided.

For a few months now Lucy goes through periods where she would pee our bed. We have flipped our mattress, used products to disinfect, numerous laundry washings etc. Nothing seemed to be helping.

We started to break down what she could be feeling threatened by. One thing that came to mind is that our 12 year old chi mix who we rescued a year ago, we have had to feed her in a different room because Lucy would bully her for her food. That place we feed her is in our bedroom.

The other thing we noticed is she dictates when she will go outside when it rains; then she won’t move if you go to walk. Last night I, with coaxing, was able to get her to walk to a building not far from our home that is grassy and she did her business. Then this morning, in the rain, again she wouldn’t walking willingly so I lifted her up and put her on the grass. She stood there and was prepared to not move, I had to coax her to do so, but she did go in the end.

So today is a new day, and we carry on, persistence is key. LoveYourPet

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Lexi had her surgery!!

Boy oh boy what a crazy day yesterday was! Mama and daddy had to take meh furiend Lexi for her surgery to remove those nasty stones from her bladder as well as the rotten teeth in her mouth.

Stones removed from Lexi's bladder May 17, 2013

These are the stones removed from Lexi’s bladder. They were caused by a bladder infection not treated. Her PH balance became unhealthy and the stones were created. The vet figures she has had these for about 4 months, with the bladder infection starting about 2 months before that.

To give a better idea of how big these are, here is a ruler showing inches of each stone.

Second pic of stones measured against ruler in inches May 18 2013

Lexi pulled teeth May 17 2013These are the teeth pulled from the back of Lexi’s mouth. She had 4 in total removed. The tartar and infection was so bad, her gums were not seen.

Lexi had a mass removed from her bladder as well. The vet says it may have been caused from the stones rubbing inside her bladder. It has been sent off for examination and hopefully it will be benign.

Today, Lexi is still a bit wobbly, but she is definitely on the mend. She had a good appetite and we see she is going to be a challenge to keep her from jumping up on the bed or walking down stairs. Her doctor said no to both. She does have that cone if she starts trying to lick her staples.

Staples after surgery May 17 2013 - Lexi

Mama says she can’t thank the many people who shared Lexi’s fundraising page and also to those who donated. Without them, this couldn’t have happened as quickly as it did. Mama says Lexi’s fundraising page is close to her goal of $2,500 and we are hoping to reach it as Lexi does need follow up vet appointments and antibiotics so her cystitis will go away.

Could you please keep her in your thoughts and prayers that her mass results will not be bad. That the results will be benign.

Fank you so much eberypawdy!

 

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November is Fight Canine Cancer Month

Woof! The gangs all here today. We are wanting to share something bery bery important!

Did you know that Canine Cancer is the leading disease related cause of death in pets? Since identifying cancer early and treating it quickly will help your dog’s prognosis, know the common signs of cancer and which cancers are common in your dog breed.

Warning Signs of Cancer
  • Abnormal swellings that persist or continue to grow
  • Sores that do not heal
  • Weight loss
  • Loss of appetite
  • Bleeding or discharge from any body opening
  • Offensive odor
  • Difficulty eating or swallowing
  • Hesitation to exercise or loss of stamina
  • Persistent lameness or stiffness
  • Difficulty breathing, urinating, or defecating   *From the American Veterinary Medical Association

Also, schedule regular vet visits and routinely examine your dog on your own. For instance, skin tumors above and below the skin.

in are the most common cancer in dogs and you can feel for these as you pet and examine your pup. Do keep in mind that not all unusual growths are cancerous! Also, not all early stages of cancer show symptoms, so when your dog simply ‘ doesn’t seem right’ (and you know when that is), schedule a vet visit. As pet parents you are your animals advocate. It’s okay to ask for second opinions and even change vets if necessary!