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Picking up Saved Dogs Today :)

Today is one of my favorite things to do; I go and pick up saved dogs from high kill shelters and transport them to the organization who has screened homes waiting for them!

As much as it can be frustrating, as it is today, due to mechanical issues with the van and weather (fog) this morning, all of which push back the arrival time, I know I will always feel the same feeling of happiness when I see them.

Rescue organizations are always looking for people who are wanting to foster animals to a suitable home can be found; if that is you, give a call to your one closest to you!

So, yes, as much as I want to watch the Super Bowl with my husband, we are going to record it and watch it together.

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Winter and Rock Salt

GreenWelcomeWe have been remiss in not keeping our animal blog up to date. As expected we know we have lost blog readers; but that’s ok, we will work on earning them back. To start, here is our post on the dangers of Rock Salt and our pets.

Each year many thousands of cats and dogs die or are made severely ill from the toxic effects of rock salt.

Local municipalities frequently use rock salt after heavy snow with sand or grit to improve traction. Householders may use it to help melt ice and snow on paths and make it easier to spade or sweep away.

Grey tabby cat sitting on post

Rock salt is very poisonous to cats and dogs. Unfortunately, they can easily ingest it when they lick their fur after being outdoors. The result can be fatal. According to the RSPCA:

It is difficult to say how much needs to be eaten for signs of toxicity to be seen. Even a small amount of pure salt can be very dangerous to pets. Ingestion can result in a high blood sodium concentration which can cause thirst, vomiting and lethargy, and in severe cases there is a risk of convulsions and kidney damage.

Most cases involve animals that have walked through gritted snow and then lick or chew it off their paws as they can find it irritating. It is therefore important to thoroughly wipe your pet’s feet and the fur on his/her legs and tummy after a walk or time outside. If he/she is showing any signs of discomfort after possible exposure to rock salt, use a mild, pet-safe shampoo and warm water to wash the affected areas, and dry your pet’s fur completely with a towel after washing.

Any animal suspected of ingestion of rock salt must be assessed by a vet immediately. This is important as signs can be non-specific and a blood test will be required to check the blood sodium concentration. Immediate veterinary treatment will be needed to rehydrate the animal and stabilise their sodium levels. The exact treatment will depend on the blood sodium concentration and the animal’s clinical condition. Owners should never attempt to induce vomiting; only a vet should do this.

If you suspect your cat has ingested rock salt do not wait to see the symptoms develop, but seek veterinary advice without delay. Again this emphasizes the importance of keeping cats indoors during severe weather whenever this is practical.

shared from the Pussington Post

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Yellow Dog Project

I have seen this a few times and wanted to share it with my readers. I think it is important anytime our furry friend is outside at an off leash park, or a leashed park or perhaps on a walk. Something very simple speaks volumes and it may just reduce the amount of dog fights, or situations where a child could be bitten.

YellowDogProject

So let’s start the new year off right!

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Let It Go

I don’t read much of Cesar Millan’s stuff these days; but every now and again when something comes along that is of use, I like to pass it along.

I do transport for the rescue of dogs (primarily). I have 2 foster failures which is not unheard of in this field lol.

If you are wanting to foster but are unsure how to go about it, Cesar’s article will help you.

Fostering is a wonderful thing that saves dogs’ lives. It gets them out of shelters and into human packs, where they can receive the rehabilitation necessary to make them adoptable.

However, fostering comes not only with the responsibility of caring for the dog, but the necessity of eventually giving up the dog when it finds its forever home. Attachment can make this process difficult. Fortunately, there are some things you can do to make the process easier.

  1. Start before you even foster
    When selecting a foster dog, don’t pick the one that you think is the cutest and ideal for your family. Pick the dog that you wouldn’t necessarily want to keep long-term. For example, if you don’t like tiny dogs, consider a Chihuahua or Yorkie. If you don’t think you’d have the resources to care for a handicapped dog for life, then find that dog who’s blind or deaf, or is missing a limb.

    This will make it easier for you to adjust to the temporary status of the foster dog, but it will also be an educational process. As Cesar says, “You don’t always get the dog you want. You get the dog you need.” If nothing else, it will allow you to experience types of dogs you would never normally adopt, and to learn even more about dog behavior.

  2. Assist in the adoption process
    Find out whether your foster program will let you help out in finding that forever home. This can range from documenting your dog’s behavior and personality for future owners to locating and interviewing potential owners themselves.

    This will help you be more confident in letting go because you’ll have a stake in the process, and you can assure yourself that you’ve found the right home for your foster.

  3. Ask for progress reports from the new family
    You can continue to take part in your foster dog’s life with photos and stories from her new family, and the Internet makes distance irrelevant. Many shelters ask this of people who adopt dogs from them, largely as a way to keep their staff positive about seeing dogs they’ve gotten to know be adopted.

    If distance permits, you could even consider having regular playdates with your current foster (and permanent pack) and adopted past fosters, as long as the new owners are agreeable.

  4. Celebrate the adoption
    Don’t think of giving up your foster to adoption as losing a dog. Think of it as a dog gaining a permanent home. It should be a cause for celebration because you have helped to save a life. Treat yourself and the dog to a fancy meal, go out to your favorite dog park, or invite friends and their dogs over for a party…

    However you choose to celebrate, focus on the positive and make the adoption a source of good memories. Document your time with each foster with photos and stories and keep a scrapbook of your successes.

  5. Foster again
    The best part about fostering dogs is that there will always be dogs to foster, and the best way to celebrate one dog leaving your life is to save the life of another. And another. With each foster that you help place in a loving home, it becomes easier to say good-bye. With each new foster, you have another chance to get to know a new dog and help him on the way to his forever home.

During the process, always keep in mind what fostering is. As Amy Romanofsky at FosterDogs.com puts it, “I never think of a foster dog as ‘mine.’ Each dog already belongs to someone else — it just so happens that I haven’t met that person yet.”

But, when you and your foster dog do meet that person, take comfort in knowing that you had a large part in making it happen, and preventing the unthinkable alternative.

Never fostered a dog before? You’re really missing out! See here the top seven reasons to foster a dog.

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When Transporters Abuse and Traumatize Dogs

A year ago, I transported for what I will only describe as a CRAP rescue. During that time, I have seen disgusting transporting and I brought it to the attention of the CRAP rescue. She denied there was a problem and that the transporter has delivered her dogs without incident. To go into the details would only horrify people, so I will hopefully be able to attach photos to truly show the conditions.

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Yesterday that all changed, I am thrilled to see and read that the transporter in question, has been outed. As more and more people are being made aware of the horrific conditions that dogs are being transported sum would say brokered up from California to the Canadian border. How it works is pullers and rescues go in with the purpose of getting dogs from high kill shelters.

The problem is, the transporter shoves as many as she can in her van, drives some 18+ hours, with no pee break, no food break, and no changing of the pee pads. Often dogs are found sitting in there feces and urine. On very hot days, there is no air condition for the dogs, the ventilation is virtually non existent and dogs have died from heat exhaustion and then being blamed on distemper. Which if you are a caring rescue, you wouldn’t transport a dog with distemper. Crates are often facing the walls, plastic kennels need a cooling system with proper ventilation because plastic traps in both heat and cold temps.

It has been mentioned that the van in question is not hers, I can verify that it is, I can also verify that often there were 2 vans that would arrive to the Canadian border. Often it is the foster who picks up the dogs and the dogs have been cleaned up, their kennel cleaned and they have been given a high protein dog food, so they are hyper upon arrival. This person has blinded everyone, except those that do know how she operates. So if the BS rescues and rescuers who continue to use this transport continue to pay her and ignore what is being said then the business continues…. sadly

Here is an except of a message shared:

“The side doors don’t open from the outside….you have to reach in along side the passenger seat grab a leash that is attached to a piece of wire that is fastened onto the latch n pull it to open the doors. The back doors were always working to open either because of broken plastic that would get jammed in the door and push down the lock button. The floor is covered with partial board and reeks of stench…..the air blew when the van was running but wasn’t getting to the dogs on the bottom of the pile….those dogs were going crazy chewing at their kennel door. Dogs stayed in their crates for over 18 hours never once getting water…walked ….or feed! Because we were fucking driving the entire time….when I asked her when were we going to stop and care for the dogs her answer was I wad hired to drive n there wad no time because we were behind….she blamed YOU the rescues saying you were on her ass to hurry and get the dogs up there! Common sense will tell you that you cant drive all that way in two days and stop and care for the dogs too….it is physically impossible with one person on the van. I never said she drugged a dog but I did say she gave them this gooy stuff from s yellow tube…she told me it perked the dogs up and made them frisky….why would they need to be perked up if they were doing so well? She stopped and cleaned crates and dogs before delivery…. they were laying in shit and piss until that point….some of the dogs had been picked up from hospital after having surgery…..their belly’s were resting in filth! She went and got bottled water n doused the dogs with it n sprayed some doggy cleaner on them n rubbed the crap off with towels. Pam Wiggly Tails posted a dog she got from Kevan a lil snuggle tooth male chi…..I cleaned up that poor lil dog who was so terrified I nearly cried. I wonder about another senior dog who wasn’t fairing well….when I looked in on her while the dogs were being loaded into the U Haul it looked lifeless. If you want to blind yourself to this cold hearted bitches business practices so you can lay your head down at night. …than I will personally do all I can to end your days in dog rescue! !!”

So where do we go from here you may be asking yourself. There are those who say stop any transports that are set up, thereby stopping dogs from being in disgusting conditions. Hold the rescues accountable, it is hard to believe that any rescue who picks up their dogs can’t see the conditions these dogs arrive in. Charge the transporter with animal abuse and have any and all dogs in her care removed. There has a call hopefully going out the Riverside Sheriff to bring this to their attention and find out what, if anything, can be done about it.

The idea is to be proactive in having others not use her, bringing her down. Slowly but surely there is progress.

If you ever have an issue with a transporter, and have evidence of it, live in the United States – you can file a complaint with Rescue Monitor http://www.rescuemonitor.org/resources.html as well you can also file a complaint with USDA, APHIS, Animal Care http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_welfare/aw_complaint_form.shtml

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Extensions

Fundraising for your cause is very hard work. Sometimes things work out and sometimes they don’t. I’ve had to extend Tika’s medical fundraiser because her cause has come to a standstill. I am at a loss as to what to do. All I know is she is worth fighting for, she is a senior, but she has an incredible liveliness about her when she doesn’t feel miserable.

I don’t like asking for donations, I, like many pet owners want to protect and raise our loved ones on our own. I see the causes out there, I realize Tika is no different than anyone else, yet how do I give in and say “sorry sweetheart, mommy failed?”

She came from a life that was not kind to her, then she was loved for many years, when her time was no longer with that person, I became blessed to have her in my life. She deserves the best, she deserves the ability to eat any and all foods presented to her, not restrictions to soft foods. She has troubles with bones, she has troubles with any treats and she has trouble with dried meat treats (I dry liver for her as a treat).

I’ve given an extension, I’ve explained who and why I’m doing this fundraiser. All I ask is you find it within yourself to donate and share her cause.

Thank you so much.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-tika-eat-without-pain/143569

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